Histology for Beginners

hello and welcome to anatomy and physiology at Glen Oaks Community College I’m dr. Ren Hartung for this video we’re going to look at histology for at least the majority of the tissues of the human body what I want you to key in on when you’re looking at histology in terms of making it as simple as possible what you’re looking for when you’re presented with a histological image like this one is that you want to look for the major features that you can make out and use that information to determine what type of tissue it is so when you’re doing histology start learning those major features of the tissue where this is important is if you see this tissue prepared a different way with different staining techniques etc then you should still be able to recognize the particular tissue that it is and if you get a slice that’s from a different part of the body that might look a little bit different as long as you’re looking for those major features you should still be able to figure out what the tissue is this slide is adipose tissue and I can tell it’s adipose tissue because the major feature of adipose tissue are these large kind of roundish white areas these are the actual adipocytes or fat cells that we see in adipose tissue there’s some other structures here this looks like a big blood blood vessel to me but don’t let that throw you off and there’s these darker staining connective tissues but the majority of what we see here are these big white open cells the adipocytes so this is how to post tissue let’s move on to the next slide this is also adipose tissue again we have these big whitish open areas these are the cells the adipocytes and this slide is showing us something else about adipose tissue and that is that the adipocytes the fat cells have nuclei of course but the nuclei are found on the periphery of the cells they’re on the edges so that’s another major feature these large open white cells with their nuclei on the periphery of the cell these are adipocytes and the tissue of course is adipose tissue next slide basically the exact same picture and what I did was I just darkened the color a little bit more so you can see it easier so but again major features for adipose tissue large whitish cells filled with the dip lanique Lee eye for the adipocytes around the peripheral on the periphery on the sides of the cells this is blood in terms of major features for blood tissue the most of the cells that you see are these little red cells these are actually red blood cells and you can see that they have this kind of lighter area in the middle of it’s because they have that kind of interesting shape of a red blood cell almost like a doughnut without a hole in the middle kind of flattened in the middle but the major feature is that you see these erythrocytes or red blood cells the other features that you can see in blood tissue when you look at it you get these large cells that are kind of bluish or purple and those are white blood cells when they stain they stain kind of bluish or purplish and if you can see this little tiny dot here at the tip of my pointer you might not be able to see it there are these little tiny either reddish or purple staining structures they’re called platelets they’re important for stopping bleeding for hemostasis or blood clotting there’s another one at the tip of my pointer there if you can’t see them look up images for blood histology and you’ll be able to find what platelets look like next slide this is dense regular connective tissue and the major feature that I’m looking at to see that it’s bends regular connective tissue is it has kind of a woodgrain appearance you get these kind of lines going left and right they’re all going in the same direction there’s lots of collagen here lots of submicroscopic collagen fibers and those fibers are all running in one direction and that’s what gives it this kind of woodgrain appearance where everything is running in one direction we also see nuclei to fibroblasts fibroblasts are the cells that live in connective tissues and those fibroblast nuclei that I’m pointing to now are kind of flattened and they’re running in the same direction as all of those collagen fibers contributing to that kind of woodgrain appearance so that again is dense regular connective tissue where we would find this in the body by the way our in tendons and ligaments moving out of the next slide this happens to be from skin and what I’m wanting my students to be able to recognize here is that this area this kind of more pinkish I guess maybe pinkish orange color here and the appearance of it you’ve got collagen fibers again like we had in the last slide but now the

collagen fibers are not running in just one direction they’re running in multiple directions so this is dense irregular connective tissue there are other structures that we see in this image that I’ll touch on briefly these are hair follicles these big purplish looking things they’re lined with epithelial tissue and it’s what hairs grow out of so in the center here that’s a hair shaft in the middle of a hair follicle and this is a glandular type of tissue also epithelial but I would just call it glandular this happens to be a sebaceous gland and there’s a sweat gland down here in case you care but again the major thing to look at here is these this area in this area and some over here to dense irregular connective tissue this is the same from the same slide by the way it’s just a lower magnification and again these areas out here a dense irregular connective tissue the other thing I could point at epithelial tissue this surface part of the skin is made up of stratified squamous epithelium that is keratinized so this would be an epithelial tissue again it’s called stratified squamous epithelium and there’s higher magnification images coming to this later so for this slide again the major thing is dense irregular connective tissue this is bone tissue and the major feature that you could recognize for bone tissue is these kind of tree ring looking structures so when you see these tree ring looking structures they’re actually called osteons these osteons really clearly indicate that this is bone tissue next slide this is simply higher magnification of bone tissue and now we can see what makes up these tree ring-like osteon structures we see these compartments that cells are living in the cells are called osteocytes the compartments are called lacunae so that’s what gives it that tree ring looking appearance so again the key here to recognizing this tissue as bone tissue is that tree ring looking appearance of the osteons this is also bone tissue this happens to be spongy bone the kind of lighter purple areas in here are the spicules of spongy bone so this would be the hardened bone matrix area and then we have these darker staining areas toward in between those spicules those darker stained areas are red bone marrow sorry so red bone marrow stains more darkly and then we have these lighter staining spicules of the hardened bone matrix in case you care within this image by the way this is a growth plate going up and down in the middle it’s in a long bone this is the area where a new bone is being added continuously and these are found at the ends of long bones again this is the growth plate and the type of tissue that’s actually at the growth plate is Highland cartilage although it looks a little bit different than the hyaline cartilage we looked at earlier this is a higher magnification image of spongy bone and again we have this dense bone type tissue in this area we have the osteocytes living in here inside of the lacunae but we don’t have the tree-ring looking appearance that we saw earlier so again this would be an image of spongy bone and out here is red yeah red bone marrow and up here is also red bone marrow this is another image of another Yule within spongy bone and again we see osteocytes living in lacunae and a bunch of spaces in here this is hyaline cartilage this one happens to be from a mouse that’s why it looks a bit different than human and the way you can recognize that a Thailand cartilage in terms of major features again is the smooth appearance of the substance between the cells the substance between the cells and by the way Highland cartilage or cartilage is a type of connective tissue and one of the major things about connective tissues is that they have usually a lot of extracellular matrix which is the stuff between the cells so here are the cells living inside of the Highland cartilage and then you get this kind of gunk in between this stuff in between and for hyaline cartilage that stuff in between is very smooth in its appearance so those are the two major features since I mentioned connective tissue has lots of extracellular matrix let me skip back real quick to bone tissue we could look at this slide from bone tissue we’ve got cells separated by

extracellular matrix the extracellular matrix and bone happens to be the hardened calcium carbonate or hydroxyapatite that we see in bone so again cells separated by this extracellular matrix that makes it a connective tissue so here we are again at Highland cartilage let’s go to the next image this is also hyaline cartilage this one is human it comes from a trachea and again we see the cells in their compartments separated by this smooth looking extracellular matrix this is the next slide it’s just higher magnification and again this is hyaline cartilage we’ve got cells separated by an extracellular matrix that tells us that it’s a connective tissue and the extracellular matrix in this case is this very smooth appearing stuff this also reminds me if it helps you hyaline cartilage is often stained like this and it has this kind of light purplish appearance and then these little bubbles one of my students years ago said that this looked like grape soda and that has stuck with me ever since so when it looks like grape soda like this think Highland cartilage that might be another trick to help you but again the major features for hyaline cartilage you’ve got these compartments with cells in them and then you have this smooth appearance of the extracellular matrix next slide this is another cartilage this one’s obviously not Highland cartilage the substance in between doesn’t have that smooth appearance it’s got this darker staining kind of roughish appearance this is elastic cartilage if we look at a higher magnification image the elastic cartilage stains more deeply out here and the extracellular matrix has a more roughish appearance in spots the reason for that is that the elastic fibers stain more darkly so we can see more of a roughened appearance it’s less smooth between these compartments so again that’s elastic cartilage this is fibrocartilage this fibrocartilage happens to come from a mouse so it looks different than what you might see with human fibrocartilage this is actually a vertebra on this side and a vertebra on this side from a mouse with fibrocartilage connecting them the two vertebrae so we see the fibrocartilage in the vertebral discs in our spine and we also see fibrocartilage in certain joints for example the knee joint has fibrocartilage let’s look at higher magnification for this fibrocartilage and we can see these fibers going in a specific direction but notice that it looks very different than that’s regular connective tissue this is even higher magnification this is 450 times magnification for what I’m looking at and again we’re looking at fibrocartilage and you can see that the fibers go in one direction and we see the chondrocytes living in here in these little compartments and you can’t really make out the compartments in the in the mouse fibrocartilage anyway so that’s fibrocartilage now we’re on to epithelial tissues this one happens to be pseudostratified columnar epithelium major features for recognizing pseudostratified columnar epithelium you have this line of cells but it looks like we have one maybe two excuse me maybe even three layers of nuclei but in reality we only have one layer of cells here so that’s why it’s called pseudo stratified columnar epithelium another trick for recognizing pseudostratified columnar epithelium can you see this kind of fuzzy brush looking border there are there’s cilia on pseudostratified columnar epithelium usually so that’s another thing too keen on in terms of a major feature of pseudo stratified columnar epithelium this happens to come from a mouse’s trachea by the way and those cilia help to move mucus along the respiratory tract in our tracheas this next slide is from gut I believe this is large intestine and what we’re looking at is another epithelial tissue can you see this line of cells here and can you see how these cells tend to be tall when they’re tall like that the shape we call them as columnar and since there’s only one layer of these cells we would call this simple columnar so this is simple columnar epithelium and you can follow that line of cells up and around and over and up and around and over so again this is an epithelial tissue

single layer of cells that are columnar and shape so this is simple columnar epithelium moving out of the next slide this is another slide that looks very similar to the last one actually looks very different but it’s the same epithelial tissue notice that we have a single line of cells here and also over here but it gets kind of muddled as we get down in this range so look at this line of cells we have a single layer of cells and they’re tall they’re taller than they are wide so this is simple columnar epithelium we could look at this line of cells over here and say the same thing and by the way this slide comes out of a kidney these are collecting ducts at the end of the way our urine flows inside of the parenchyma of a kidney moving on to the next slide this is another slide from gut I think this is from small intestine and again look at where the pointer is from the microscope look at this line of cells and see if you could name right now with this line of cells is because we’ve named this already if you haven’t named it yet but you want to pause the video and keep thinking about it we have one one layer of cells here and those cells are taller than they are wide so this is simple columnar epithelium there’s another type of cell that we see in this image by the way these kind of whitish cells these are called goblet cells and they produce mucus for the digestive tract you often see these types of cells and pseudostratified columnar epithelium as well by the way because goblet cells make mucus for our respiratory tract as well so again this slide is simple columnar epithelium moving on the next slide this should be another epithelial tissue and what we’re looking at is right where that microscope pointer is pointing this line of cells going in a circle there’s one layer of cells and these cells are not tall they’re kind of squat they’re more cube shaped so this is simple cuboidal epithelium simple because there’s only one layer of cells cuboidal because these cells are more cube shaped and of course epithelium moving on to the next oh by the way this slide happens to also be from a kidney and these are tubules from nephrons the next slide this happens to be lung tissue and what we see in these open kind of cavities these are alveoli inside of lung and remember me talking about big white cavities being adipose tissue before this is obviously not adipose tissue because I said already that’s lung and the way that you know that it’s not adipose tissue is this big white cavity is actually lined with cells you can see the cells lining it and in this case there’s rich capillary beds on the edges those reddish so this would not be at a postition I was hoping for a higher magnification image so that you might be able to see what we’re supposed to be looking for here and that is that the the alveoli are lined with simple squamous epithelial cells there’s a single layer of cells lining this area here and the edge of this area here simple squamous epithelium let’s look at the next slide I tend to use this slide more for simple squamous epithelium this is from a kidney again and what we’re seeing here is this capsule inside of the kidney it’s called the glomerular capsule or Bowman’s capsule this capsule is lined with cells that are very flat and there’s only one layer of them because there’s only one layer we call it simple because these cells are flat we call this we call it squamous so this would be simple squamous epithelium lining this capsule here while we’re here we could look up here and I’ll give you another test kind of question look at this circle of cells and see if you can tell me what kind of epithelium this is and pause the video if you want a chance to really think about it there’s only one layer of cells here so this would be simple and the cells are more cube shaped they’re not tall they’re kind of short and squat so they’re kind of cube shaped so this would be simple cuboidal epithelium here and we see that also over here and over here for this slide let’s move to the next one this is from a mouse’s esophagus by the way and what we’re looking at is this epithelial tissue that lines the

esophagus notice that we’ve got lots of cells this epithelium starts down here that’s the basal side of it and then up here is the apical surface for this epithelium so there’s lots and lots of cells here so we wouldn’t call it simple we call this stratified and when we’re naming a tissue that is stratified let me go over here and say this again is the bottom and this is the top in terms of the shape we use the shape that we can see it towards the apical surface or the top of it these cells are much more flattened and if I go to the next image you might see it better can you see how these cells are much more flattened so this would be stratified because there’s multiple layers squamous because the cells are more flattened at the apical surface and of course epithelium so again this image is stratified squamous epithelium in the esophagus we don’t have keratinization or we don’t have lots of keratinization so this would be non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium one of the ways you don’t one of the ways that you know that these aren’t highly keratinized by the way is they have a more smooth appearance towards the surface you’ll see what I mean in a second let’s look at this slide this is another epithelial tissue and see if you can name the epithelium at the Pointer here’s the bottom part of it and here’s the top part of it you so again pause the video if you want to think about it more of it here’s the bottom cells this epithelium reaches all the way up here to the top so obviously there’s more than one layer of cells so this would be stratified and if we look at the top for the shape notice that these cells are really flat so this would be squamous this would be stratified squamous epithelium just like what we saw on the last slide the reason it looks very different is that this is keratinized stratified squamous epithelium this happens to be skin in terms of being highly keratinized by the way I said I’d tell you in a minute here notice how this surface doesn’t look smooth it looks kind of almost crackly like these cells are kind of breaking off since this is the surface of the skin these cells end up drying out ultimately and they kind of flake off over time and because there’s so much keratin in them they’re very very tough they’re very firm cells so they have this kind of crackling off appearance to them rather than the smooth appearance that we see with non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium let’s move on to the next one this is another epithelial tissue and it doesn’t go by the same kind of naming system that I’ve been using where we use the number of layers and the shape of the cells for this one we have multiple layers of cells in the epithelium starts down here and leads to the top up here but if you notice we don’t have any specific uniform shape some of these cells kind of look almost tallish some of them are very roundish towards the surface usually they are very round towards the bottom they might look almost squamous or flattish so we don’t have a specific shape to key in on here so we can’t use that that method of using the shape and the number of cells for this one we just call it transitional epithelium transitional epithelium lines the urinary bladder and it lines the ureter and this is actually a cross-section of someone’s you writer and again this is transitional epithelium one of the characteristics of transitional epithelium is it’s capable of stretching a lot and that may be why it was called transitional if you stretch it out if you make it really taut the cells look squamous and when we let it be really loose you see this kind of appearance where we don’t see a good defined cell shape moving out of the next image we’re getting away from epithelial tissue now notice that what we have are these long cells almost like long tubes and if you look close you can see multiple nuclei on the edges of these long tubes this is skeletal muscle let’s look at the next image I’m hoping it’s higher magnification nope this is just another image of skeletal muscle what you would be able to see if this was higher magnification is you’d be able to see striations these little kind of tiny lines going across the muscle cells that’s another way that you know that it’s some skeletal muscle long tubes of striated cells that’s skeletal muscle this is skeletal muscle actually from somebody’s tongue and the way that I know that it’s from somebody’s tongue is that we have these skeletal muscle fibers or skeletal muscle cells going in this direction and then over here we have skeletal muscle cells also that have been cut transversely these are cut longitudinally so imagine this is a garden hose and it’s lying in this direction

imagine the garden hose is facing you and we just cut it across all you see is a circle that’s the way these muscle fibers have been cut and again notice that we have nuclei kind of towards the periphery and you have multiple nuclei where where they’ve been caught in some places here’s one nucleus two nucleus for this cell in this cell we only have one but on these cells you can see multiple nuclei going along the cell and again I don’t know if you can see it I can see it on my computer here as I’m recording um there are striations going across the cell these little kind of pinkish lines hopefully excuse me hopefully when we get to higher magnification you’ll be able to see those striations this is higher magnification of that first skeletal muscle cell or skeletal muscle slide that I showed you and now we can see better the striations going across I don’t know if you’ll be able to see them hopefully but you can also see the multiple nuclei on the edges of these cells so here’s one skeletal muscle cell again notice that it’s a long tube and the cell is striated it’s got these little striations going left to right there’s multiple nuclei on the edges so those are the major features for skeletal muscle long tubes multiple nuclei on the edges and striations this slide is also skeletal muscle the slide is called skeletal muscle teased so what they’ve done is you can see really well in this slide the long tubes of the skeletal muscle cells and they’ve actually taken some kind of instrument and pulled the cells apart so you can see the individual cells better so you can imagine way back here all of these little tiny cells they’ve just teased them apart in this slide here’s higher magnification and I think even on YouTube right now you’ll be able to see the striations can you see those lines going left and right those are the striations that help to indicate that this is skeletal muscle over here you might be able to see them even better those are the striations and again we have a long tube that makes up the cell and we have those striations you can also see a little bit here the nuclei on the sides coming up this side this is a slide from the same company slide back here was a slide that was bought back in the 70s from that company this is a slide that we bought recently within the last few years from that company I was kind of disappointed when I got this they’ve changed their techniques for preparation quite a bit but this is still skeletal muscle teased and the same features are still there we’ve got long tubes with multiple nuclei and we’ve got stations going across the tube of the muscle fiber or muscle cell let’s go to the next image this is also muscle tissue but this is a different type of muscle tissue we don’t have the lot we still have what appear like long tubes but between the long tubes we’ve got these dark lines separating one cell from the next cell those dark lines are called intercalated discs we’ve also still got striations but you can also notice in places that there’s places where instead of being long tubes we’ve got these little branches that kind of interconnect so while this is muscle this is actually a different kind of muscle this is cardiac muscle the type of muscle that we find in the heart the cardiac muscle cells or cardiac myocytes are shorter than skeletal muscle cells they’re connected with each other by these intercalated discs these dark areas and they’re still striated like skeletal muscle is and then of course the other feature that I mentioned is that they’re interconnected with each other instead of being one long tube these cells tend to be interconnected they tend to be branched and interconnected so that’s a cardiac muscle this is another image of cardiac muscle by the way and this really um this picture combined with the one from two slides ago so this one compared with this one it’s a really good reason or a really good example of why you want to memorize the features of these tissue tissues rather than memorizing the color and the shape for the particular picture that you’re looking at so if you look at this picture and we’re talking about major features again what I can see is I’ve got these cells where we’ve got these branches that interconnect the cells in these spots and areas and we’ve got these kind of dark lines going across and we’ve got striations that I can see so dark lines cells that are kind of short and interconnected striations and then the dark lines again that are the

intercalated discs this is obviously cardiac muscle and again if I go back this is cardiac muscle and again the major features are those striations the dark lines that connect the cells and then the branching of the cells where they interconnect with each other another major feature you could consider within cardiac muscle is that you’ve got the nuclei and then you’ve got these kind of white spaces around the nuclei the white stuff around the nuclei is um it’s the way we store glucose um see if I can remember it fast enough glycogen these whitish areas their glycogen you can think of that as the heart muscle cells storing sugar in case it needs it glycogen near the nuclei so again this is cardiac muscle let’s move on this is another slide of cardiac muscle when I took the picture it was actually a little bit out of focus but you can see the striations over here and you can see some of the intercalated disks over here and there’s another one over here kind of out of focus but again branched cells that are interconnected with these dark lines connecting them the intercalated disks and we see striations so this is cardiac muscle another image of cardiac muscle in focus more and the thing I kept this image for is it shows the branching more you can see how these cardiac myocytes or cardiac muscle cells they branch and interconnect with each other and get some nuclei another and it might be a nuclei let’s go to this one and then the white stuff again being um why am i tripping on the white stuff it’s some glycogen this is smooth muscle this is another image that’s got and up here if you look close you’ll see the simple columnar epithelium that we saw before that’s part of the mucosa of the gut this is submucosa and then this is muscularis so this is muscle tissue again but this is the third type of muscle tissue let’s go to high magnification so we can look at the features of this type of muscle tissue in this particular type of mish muscle tissue we have much shorter cells and the cells have what’s called a fusiform shape they tend to have a point on one end they get thicker towards the metal and they tend to have a point on the other end and another thing about them is they have one single nuclei in each cell this is smooth muscle the other feature that you might notice is missing from this type of muscle than from the other types of muscle is that we don’t see any striations so we’ve got little cells that are fusiform in shape single nuclei in each cell and no striations this is smooth muscle again and we’re back to the beginning so that’s all of the major histology that I have on these pictures and I’ll run through it from the beginning again just so we can name the tissues as we go through and that’ll be the last thing I do for this video so maybe test yourself what type of tissue is this the answer is this is adipose tissue what type of tissue is this the answer for this one is that this is blood tissue a type of connective tissue and by the way adipose tissue also a type of connective tissue remember how I said connective tissues have lots of extracellular matrix between the cells for adipose tissue that’s the exception there’s very little extracellular matrix between the cells of the Depot sites blood again as a connective tissue and it has plasma or the liquid between the cells as it’s extracellular matrix what type of tissue is this this is dense regular connective tissue what type of connector find here and here this one is dense irregular connective tissue same slide again what type of tissue out here it’s dense array active tissue what type of tissue is this answer for this one is this is bone another of the types of connective tissue and there it is at higher magnification again what made your type of tissue we find here

this is also bone and this happens to be spongy bone same again and same again bone tissue what type of tissue is this this one happens to be Highland cartilage and we see cells and compartments separated by this smooth appearing extracellular matrix what type of tissue is this and the answer again just like the last one is this is Highland cartilage we have these compartments containing cells separated by the smooth extracellular matrix what type of tissue is this answer for this one is that this is um elastic cartilage elastic cartilage we’ve got compartments again separated by the extracellular matrix but it’s not as smooth this time because of the extra elastic fibers that are out here type of tissue is this one I’ll go to the higher magnification image this one is fibrocartilage these nice fibers going in one direction and a high magnification we see the cells separated by this matrix fibrocartilage and again if you’re in med school or something go look and make sure you look at a human preparation because it looks a bit different than this what type of epithelium do we see at the pointer and the answer to this one is pseudostratified columnar epithelium that’s a type of epithelium here pseudostratified columnar epithelium next slide what type of epithelium do we see at the pointer you the answer to this one is simple columnar epithelium for this slide could use this pointer but I prefer this line of cells or this one so what type of epithelium is represented by this line of cells the answer to this one is simple columnar epithelium name the epithelium at the pointer here the answer to this one is simple columnar epithelium another thing I could do for this slide is name the cell that we see here or here so see if you can name that type of that specific type of cell those cells are called goblet cells and they make mucus and let’s see if we see any goblet cells back here not in this particular image of the pseudo stratified columnar epithelium but they could appear so we’ll be ready for goblet cells there as well looking at this one what type of epithelium is at the pointer the answer to this one is simple cuboidal epithelium looking at this slide on a lab exam most likely the instructor would put the pointer excuse me right on one of these edges so this edge over here or this edge down here maybe and hopefully they’d have a high enough magnification so that you can see the cells this again is lung tissue and it’s lined with simple squamous epithelium slide right where that pointer is this line of cells here named the epithelium the answer to this one is simple squamous epithelium moving onto this slide and more likely on one of my exams would be this higher magnification name the epithelium at the pointer the answer for this one is stratified squamous epithelium this is uncut keratinized so depending on what your instructor requires you might have to say uncharacterized squamous epithelium

for my students just stratified squamous epithelium is fine name the epithelium at the pointer the answer for this slide is also stratified squamous epithelium this one happens to be keratinized so this would be keratinized stratified squamous epithelium for this slide named the epithelium at the pointer and the answer for this one is transitional epithelium nextslide name this tissue you the answer for this one is skeletal muscle tissue or skeletal muscle for this one name this tissue and the answer for this one is skeletal muscle but here’s what I want to throw you to kind of put a monkey wrench in to make you think named this tissue out here because the skeletal muscle is separated by this kind of tissue in the tongue the answer to that is adipose tissue we see these big white areas these big white cells and they have nuclei on the sides so this is adipose tissue there’s adipose tissue here and there’s adipose tissue over here if you were able to answer that before I gave you the answer then pat yourself on the back name this tissue for this slide this is skeletal muscle name this tissue a little muscle and for this image to name the tissue and again the answer is skeletal muscle just a higher magnification next slide name the tissue an answer for this one so skeletal muscle again long tubes striated with multiple nuclei along the edges for this slide name the specific tissue this one happens to be for the answer its cardiac muscle this next slide I’ll go to higher magnification name the tissue and for the answer again for this one its cardiac muscle and this is also cardiac muscle and for this one it’s also cardiac muscle for this one let’s go up to high magnification and name the tissue right where the pointer is that this whole big pink area and so the answer for this one is smooth muscle and we’re back to adipose tissue so I hope this video on histology has been helpful for you it’s obviously not everything if you don’t take anything else away from this remember when you’re looking at histology try to find the major features so that you can recognize any tissue when it’s presented to you again I hope this helps if you have any questions or comments please feel free to UM put it in the comment section and thank you once again for watching